NEXT-GEN Communication:
Social Networking and Making Media on the Web

INSTRUCTOR:

Bruce Wolcott

OFFICE HOURS:

by appointment

TEXTBOOK:

Mobilizing Generation 2.0 by Ben Rigby
Available on the BCC Media Center Website
Books 24/7

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course introduces new next-generation Web 2.0 social networking skills including use of current Web tools, managing personal knowledge, locating trustworthy resources, producing multimedia content, creating an online identity, and being civically engaged. Collaborative groups will explore the use of blogs, wikis, online presentations, web conferencing and other communication skills in preparation for 21st century careers. Other topics relevant to this topic include: an historic overview of Web technologies, “rules of the road” for online communications, and issues related to copyright as well as open source concepts. These objectives be accomplished through a series of lectures, discussions, film and video clips, in-class tutorials and group projects.

GENERAL LEARNING GOALS

  1. Explain the origins of the computer, Internet, and World Wide Web and define related terminology.
  2. Explain some of the key issues related to online privacy, network computer protection, identity theft, and netiquette.
  3. Describe Web 2.0 , what it is and isn’t, and its relationship to academic and career goals
  4. Demonstrate how to access online Web 2.0 applications and add content to the Web using blogs, wikis, audio podcasts, video/image editing tools, screen capture, Google docs, and other social networking technologies.
  5. Investigate and demonstrate communication features and uses of blogs, wikis, streaming video, podcasts, RSS feeds, bookmarks and other social networking technologies.
  6. Demonstrate fundamental techniques for building a career-enhancing online identity.
  7. Create and manage a web conference on a topic related to a specified Web 2.0 technology.
  8. Create an online personal information management system to develop an updateable archive for documenting information learned in the class.
  9. Participate in an online networked event, such as SuperStruct, Second Life, or other organized multi-participant process.
  10. Clearly describe the following concepts as they pertain to copyright: intellectual property, creative commons, open source.
  11. Identify major Web-based file types and their applications

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  1. Set up and use a blog as a personal information knowledgebase and communications platform
  2. Subscribe to an RSS feed
  3. Sign on to Wikipedia, and learn how to contribute
  4. Create a private or group wiki space for the class
  5. Create social networking accounts at Facebook, Ning, and Second Life. Post images and messages.
  6. Create and use an account at Delicious to store bookmarks
  7. Add links to Digg and other social bookmarking sites
  8. Use Audacity to create a podcast, and then post it to the Web
  9. Edit images and organize them with Flickr and Picasa 3.
  10. Use an online image editor to modify photographs online
  11. Shoot a video, edit it in Microsoft MovieMaker, and post it to YouTube
  12. Use the Google applications site for cloud computing and collaboration
  13. Use Twitter and a cell phone to post and receive information
  14. Host a web conference on Elluminate or EVO
  15. Participate in Superstruct, an online multiparticipant future forecasting game, and evaluate the results.

THE COURSE ONLINE
There will be an online course management site to augment class materials in BCC’s Blackboard/Vista. Details will be provided in class.

WEEKLY TOPICS AND DISCUSSIONS

Week 1 - INTRODUCTION AND HISTORICAL OVERVIEW OF WEB 2.0

ASSIGNMENT: First day of class - Read Introduction in Mobilizing Generation 2.0. Create a personal blog.

  1. Class Survey and introductions
  2. Orientation and use of Vista/Blackboard course management system
  3. Internet self-protection: privacy, identity, reputation, firewalls, cautionary tales
  4. Crowdsourcing and the Open Source classroom as a teaching/learning community
  5. History and overview of Web 2.0, the semantic Web, and related technologies
  6. Client-server versus “the cloud”
  7. Getting started – Browsers, Web sites, blogs, basic HTML
  8. Create a blog for personal information management using Blogger or WordPress
  9. Create a wiki
  10. Web 2.0 vocabulary introduction

ASSIGNMENT FOR WEEK TWO - Read Chapter 1 through page 57 in Mobilizing Generation 2.0 (blogging), review assigned online videos, initiate a personal blog and archive your notes and links from Week 1.

Week 2 – INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: LIBRARY RESOURCES,
BROWSERS, RSS FEEDS, BOOKMARKS
  1. History and uses of the browser: Windows IE, Netscape, Firefox, Safari, Chrome, Flock
  2. Set up RSS newsfeed and explore its uses
  3. Tag clouds and folksonomies
  4. Create and use a Delicious account and Google favorites for uploading, organizing, and tracking bookmarks
  5. Overview of Reddit, Digg, and Technorati
  6. Searching, online research, plagiarism, citations, and finding “trusted” Web resources
  7. BCC library resources and cybrarian servicres.
  8. Open source knowledge, iPod University, Stanford, MIT, Carnegie Mellon
  9. Online Personal Learning Network

ASSIGNMENTS FOR WEEK THREE - Read Chapter 2 through page 96 in Mobilizing Generation 2.0 (social networking), review assigned online videos, archive your notes and links from Week 2 in your personal blog.

Week 3 – SOCIAL NETWORKING PART I
  1. Uses for social network applications: Facebook, MySpace, LinkedIn, Plaxo, Ning
  2. Create social networking account on Facebook and Twitter
  3. Creating a personal brand and online identity
  4. Final Project Team assignments
  5. Initiate a team wiki and Ning community site on a chosen topic

ASSIGNMENTS FOR WEEK FOUR - Read Chapter 5 (wikis) through page 185 in Mobilizing Generation 2.0 (social networking), review assigned online videos, archive your notes and links from Week 3 in your personal blog.

Week 4 – SOCIAL NETWORKING PART II

PRESENTATION 1 DUE THIS WEEK: Post Project 1 on the Class Wiki

  1. Google apps – docs, IM, other networking apps
  2. Microsoft Live, Open Office, and open source software
  3. Civic Engagement – smart mobs, cell phones, instant messaging

ASSIGNMENTS FOR WEEK FIVE - Read Chapter 3 (video and photo sharing) through page 127 in Mobilizing Generation 2.0 , review assigned online videos, archive your notes and links from Week 4 in your personal blog.

Week 5 – WEB IMAGES
  1. Introduction to Web images, JPG, GIF, PNG
  2. Online image resources and screen captures
  3. Flickr, Picasa, and photo blogs
  4. Creating and using an account in Flickr
  5. Adobe Photoshop Express and Picasa image editors
  6. Adding images to blogs and wikis

ASSIGNMENT FOR WEEK 6 - Review assigned online videos, archive your notes and links from Week 5 in your personal blog.

Week 6 – WEB PRESENTATIONS
  1. Copyright, intellectual property, Creative Commons, open source
  2. Creating, editing, and posting online slide shows using SlideRocket
  3. Mid-term exam

ASSIGNMENTS FOR WEEK SEVEN - Review assigned online videos, archive your notes and links from Week 5 in your personal blog.

Week 7 – WEB VIDEO AND SLIDE SHOWS

PRESENTATION 2 DUE THIS WEEK

  1. Shooting and editing video using the Flip camera and Windows MovieMaker
  2. Posting video to YouTube or other online video services
  3. Cell phone cameras

ASSIGNMENTS FOR WEEK 8 - Review assigned online videos, archive your notes and links from Week 4 in your personal blog.

Week 8 – PODCASTING
  1. Planning podcasts
  2. Editing audio in Audacity
  3. Posting audio and video podcasts

ASSIGNMENTS FOR WEEK 9 - Read Chapter 6 (maps) through page 213 and Chapter 7 to 258 (virtual worlds) in Mobilizing Generation 2.0 , review assigned online videos, archive your notes and links from Week 4 in your personal blog.

Week 9 – WEB CONFERENCING
  1. Orientation to Elluminate
  2. Screencasting and screen capture
  3. Integrating Powerpoints and video into Elluminate
  4. Running a web conference
  5. Second Life and virtual worlds

ASSIGNMENTS FOR WEEK 10 - Review assigned online videos, archive your notes and links from Week 4 in your personal blog. Prepare for final projects

Week 10 – GOOGLE MAPS, SMART MOBS, ONLINE CIVIC ENGAGEMENT
  1. Participation in SuperStruct and follow-up documentation

ASSIGNMENTS FOR WEEK 11 – Prepare for final projects

Week 11 - FINAL EXAM AND PRESENT FINAL GROUP PRESENTATIONS

FINAL INDIVIDUAL PRESENTATIONS GIVEN
FINAL EXAM (multiple choice)

PERSONAL COURSE INFORMATION ARCHIVE BLOG DUE


MAJOR ASSIGNMENTS
There will be several individual and group projects. All projects will be submitted online, and in some cases as a Word document that will be emailed to the instructor for review and grading.

  1. Create a personal blog that documents and archives your learning about Web 2.0 this quarter, in and out of the class room. (100 points)
  2. Choose a Web-based topic and post it to the class wiki as part of the ongoing course knowledgebase. (100 points)
  3. Create a 1 minute video including live motion, images, titles, and sound. Post it on YouTube and link it to your personal blog and class wiki. (50 points)
  4. Create a 1 minute slide show including images, text, and sound. Post it to the Web and link it to your personal blog and class wiki. (50 points)
  5. Create a 1 minute audio podcast, post it to the Web and link it to your personal blog and class wiki. (50 points)
  6. In-class group participation exercise (details to be announced) (50 points)
  7. Based on your learning experience in this class, describe a plan for how your intend to use Web 2.0 technologies in the future. (100 points)
  8. Complete a team project web conference on a chosen topic using EVO or Elluminate, and present it live to the class. (100 points)
  9. Mid-term and final tests consisting of multiple choice questions (100 points each)

Students will be required to work in teams towards presenting group projects online. Students must also be prepared to discuss all reading assignments in assigned texts, reserved articles, and hand-outs.


ATTENDANCE
You are expected to attend all in-class sessions. A roll call will be taken at the beginning of each class. If you aren't present when your name is called or you skip the second hour of class after the break, you will be marked absent for that day. More than three unexcused absences during the quarter will result in your final grade being marked down one letter grade. Example: a B- would be marked down to a C-.
This requirement is intended 1) to prevent having to adjudicate individual excuses, and 2) to recognize that excuses are ultimately irrelevant both here at BCC and in the workplace.
For more information regarding my attendance policy, check the Getting Started section called About Writing Essays, Attendance & Plagiarism. If you are absent for a class or need to leave early, you need to let me know the reason for your absence either verbally or by WebCT email before the class begins, or it will be counted as an unexcused absence.


LATE WORK
You are given a two-day grace period on all due dates unless otherwise specified. This means that an assignment due by Monday must be submitted no later than Wednesday. Please note this grace period is meant for you to overcome a last minute technical difficulty or personal illness. It is not meant to give you an opportunity to put off your work until the last minute. Work that you submit after the grace period will have 15% of the grade deducted. Assignments turned in later than one week after the grace period will not be accepted, and will receive a 0 (zero) grade.


SYLLABUS CHANGES:
Contents of this syllabus may be changed at anytime during the quarter by the instructor's discretion.


EXTRA CREDIT
For special credit and by permission of the instructor, students can read High Tech-Heretic and give a presentation on the book, critiquing what the author has to say, and stating whether you agree or disagree with the authors' views and why or why not.


ONLINE ETIQUETTE
Just as in a classroom, disruptions and impoliteness are not tolerated, neither will they be tolerated within the confines of our online "classroom." Students are to show respect towards each other and their instructor, which includes respect and tolerance for each others ideas. Any sort of disrespect will, at the very least, impact negatively on your class participation grade.